August 2011

The Beetle Problem August 3, 2011 : 2:47 PM

From the Climate Reality Blog:

“When we burn dirty sources of energy like coal and oil, we release carbon pollution into the atmosphere. Thankfully, some of the pollution is taken up by carbon “sinks” — ecosystems like oceans and grasslands that store carbon and temporarily keep it from warming the atmosphere.”

“A new study estimates that between 1990 and 2007, the world’s established forests stored about a third of the carbon from dirty fuels. But forests need to be healthy to hang onto their stored carbon, and a little beetle is posing a big challenge to forests in western North America.”

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The Global Warming Reader August 4, 2011 : 4:54 PM

My good friend, Bill McKibben, has edited a fantastic book of texts, excerpts, speeches, testimony, and writings from a wide-variety of voices on the climate crisis. The book begins with Nobel Prizewinner Svante Arrhenius' writing from 1896 about the rule of fossil fuels in temperature rise and includes pieces from my mentor Roger Revelle, Jim Hansen, President of the Maldives Mohamed Nasheed, and the wonderful writer Betsy Kolbert.

As Bill writes in his introduction, "We need to feel what's happening, not just in our overheating bodies but in our minds and spirits too."

For more information go to http://www.orbooks.com

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Fuels They Don't Want August 5, 2011 : 3:39 PM

David Robert’s at Grist reports on an incredible story:

“One recent bit of Republican brazenness deserves to be called out, though. The military has said that it does not want to consider high-carbon fuels among its future options. Congressional conservatives and fossil-state Democrats are attempting to tell the Pentagon, no, you must consider high-carbon fuels.”

“In short, conservatives are disagreeing with the considered judgment of the military on the national security implications of fossil fuels. One might even accuse them of hating our troops.”

Source: Grist

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The Mountain Within August 8, 2011 : 2:58 PM

Herta Von Stiegel, the founder and CEO of Ariya Capital Group, has put together a wonderful new book entitled, The Mountain Within: Leadership Lessons andInspiration for Your Climb to the Top. Far from your typical leadership book, Hera draws upon the lessons she learned from leading a group of 28 climbers, including seven disabled people, to the top of Mount Kilimanjaro for charity. In addition, she interviews a wide-array of leaders and businesspeople from Kay Unger (a fashion designer) to Sam Chisholm (an Australian media executive). My colleague, David Blood, and I also participated.

To learn more about the book, go to the website and watch the trailer: http://bit.ly/oCJD2u

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Tune In August 25, 2011 : 2:10 PM

This week, I'll be appearing in an online interview with Alex Bogusky to discuss the climate crisis and our upcoming 24 Hours of Reality event.  You can tune in, live, on Friday, August 26th at 12PM mountain time.  

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Congratulations Joe Romm August 31, 2011 : 1:22 PM

Joe Romm’s indispensible blog Climate Progress turned five this week. During that time it has been on the front lines fighting climate deniers and misinformation in media.

If Joe’s blog isn’t on your must read list, it should be.

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The Dirtiest Fuel on the Planet August 31, 2011 : 5:38 PM

The leaders of the top environmental groups in the country, the Republican Governor of Nebraska, and millions of people around the country—including hundreds of people who have bravely participated in civil disobedience at the White House—all agree on one thing: President Obama should block a planned pipeline from the tar sands of Alberta to the Gulf of Mexico. 

The tar sands are the dirtiest source of liquid fuel on the planet. This pipeline would be an enormous mistake.  The answer to our climate, energy and economic challenges does not lie in burning more dirty fossil fuels —instead, we must continue to press for much more rapid development of renewable energy and energy efficient technologies and cuts in the pollution that causes global warming.  

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